passenger seat

Off the Page

Posted on

Years ago I decided to scrapbook in a 12×12 format, rather than in 8.5×11. I love the symmetry of the square and the room I have to tell my story. However, there are times when my story stretches beyond the limit of the 12×12 canvas. How can I scrapbook beyond the borders of my page?

Recently, two of my three children have gotten their driver’s licenses. My husband and I have been relegated to the passenger seat, both literally and figuratively. On this layout, I wanted to show how my son is driving off down the road and into his future by stretching my story beyond the page. All of the elements on my layout draw the eye up and off the canvas.

passenger seat

First, I placed the photo so that the reader can see the road out of the front window going across and off the page. Second, I tilted the patterned paper underneath the photograph so that the edges are pointing off to the top left. Next, I used a patterned paper with a chevron print that points off the page. Lastly, I placed cork clouds in the top left corner to further draw the reader’s eye off the page and reinforce the theme of my layout.

To see more examples of extending your story beyond the canvas, check out the Get It Scrapped blog.

Now go create!


retail therapy

Using a Limited Color Palette

Posted on

I LOVE color. I could spend days on Pinterest just pinning color combinations that I love (see my Color Inspiration board here.) But when I scrapbook, there are times when I want to limit the use of color.

In this layout, I purposely used a limited color palette of pink and black to complement the blue and grey in the photographs. The pictures are somewhat busy and bold, so the soft pink does not compete with the photographs. The black accents ground the page and give structure to the layout.

retail therapy

All of the embellishments are in the same colors, yet add needed texture and dimension to the page. I added just a touch of gold to set off my title.

To learn more about using a limited color palette on your layouts, check out the blog at Get It Scrapped.

Now go create!


It’s Calvinball Time!

Posted on

It is March and it’s time once again for Calvinball at the Get It Scrapped forums!

What is Calvinball you might ask? Well, it is a scrapbooking challenge based on the Calvin and Hobbes comic strip in which Calvin and Hobbes make up a game that has constantly changing rules.

Your challenge is to make as many layouts/cards/projects as you can during the month of March. Points are earned in a variety of ways and the rules are always changing!

Sound fun? Then head on over to the Get It Scrapped forum to join and play!


Clean and Simple

Posted on

When I first started scrapbooking, all the popular magazines were full of vintage, shabby chic, and artsy-styled pages. I tried over and over to emulate these styles, but was usually not satisfied with my work. Then Simple Scrapbooks magazine came along. The layouts in this magazine were exactly my style!

I have always been a clean and simple scrapbooker. I love the perfect symmetry of the 12×12 canvas on which to work. I love to use one or two photos to perfectly capture my story then complete the page with only patterned paper and a few well-chosen embellishments.

To document my daughter’s 16th birthday, I knew I wanted to make a page with a very clean and simple style. My daughter is a very uncomplicated, straightforward young woman and my goal was to create a layout that reflected her personality. I converted the photo to black & white to minimize distractions in the background.

I chose a neutral background then added just a few more patterns in strips of paper under the photo. Finally I added just two enamel dots to add a little texture to the page.

The clean and simple style is one that I use often. I love this style in that it allows the photograph and story to shine. To see more examples of the style, go on over to the Get It Scrapped blog.

Now go create!


Photojournalist Style

Posted on

“The scrapbooker working with a photojournalist story style reports events, incidents, and daily life with solid journaling, multiple photos, and a descriptive title. Elements are often arranged in a grid or blocked arrangement so that all the pieces supporting a clear story are present.” –from Story Styles Lookbook at Get It Scrapped.

The photojournalist story style is not one that I use often in my scrapbooking, but there are times when this style is perfect for telling a certain story. I have had photos from my son’s 16th birthday for almost two years that I had not scrapbooked. Finally I decided it was time to get this story told.

When my son turned 16, we planned a surprise trip for him to Great Wolf Lodge. My sister and niece and nephew also joined us which made for a great celebration and many photographs. When I decided to document this event, I knew I wanted to include substantial journaling and several pictures. Using a photojournalist story style, I was able to effectively tell this story while creating an attractive page. The grid format organizes my pictures into a cohesive whole and gives the reader a path to follow through the page.

For more information about using this and other story styles in your scrapbooking, check out the membership at Get It Scrapped.

Now go create!